Key signs to be aware of to avoid being bitten by a dog

Inspector Clouseau: Does your dog bite?

Hotel clerk: No

Inspector Clouseau: [bending down to pet dog] Nice doggie

[Dog bites Clouseau on the hand]

Inspector Clouseau: I thought you said your dog did not bite!

Hotel clerk: That is not my dog

 

Inspector Clouseau dog bite sketch
The dog bite sketch from The Pink Panther Strikes Again

The above quote and image are taken from “The Pink Panther Strikes Again” (1976) and it is one of the funniest skits that Peter Sellars played in his role of Inspector Clouseau.  In real life, dog bites are no laughing matter.  According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), there are approximately 4.5 million dog bites occurring in the United States every year.  Regrettably, in 2016 there were 41 dog bite-related fatalities in the US. Even dog lovers who have grown up with dogs and are used to being around dogs are not immune to being bitten.  So what can you do to protect yourself?

Signs that a dog is about to bite

Just as with people, you can tell a lot about a dog’s mood by the body language he is using.  Dogs can bite in 1/40th of a second, so knowing what to be aware of in the lead up to that can be helpful. There are 9 key signs to look for that can indicate when a dog may be about to bite.  Some of them are subtle and may easily be confused with other moods.

Low growling

A dog may growl for a whole range of reasons, and not all of these are a sign of bad things to come.  If you start to hear a quiet, low growling sound, this can indicate that it is time to be concerned that the dog is going to be aggressive. If he is also snapping at the same time you need to take action.

Showing front teeth

When a dog bares his teeth, this may be for a variety of reasons.  Sometimes it is because he is being submissive, but other times it is because he is being aggressive.  An aggressive “smile” is often accompanied by other behaviors as given below, so look out for a combination of all of these things.

dog showing teeth

Rigid body

If the dog’s body suddenly stiffens and the tail raises slightly, you are being given a warning sign.

Direct eye contact and whales eyes

Whale eyes

The above image shows a dog whaling his eyes.  If a dog is showing more of the whites of his eyes than usual by turning his head away but is still staring at the thing that he feels is threatening him, it is a clear signal that the dog is uncomfortable.

Shaking and drooling

A dog may start shaking from the adrenaline rush from the stressful situation.  The stress can also cause a dog to drool more than usual.

Wagging tail

Commonly thought of as a sign of happiness, this is not always the case. If the dog’s tail is raised higher than the normal wagging position and his body is perfectly still, you know there is a potential for a problem.

Canine body language

Licks lips, turns away, and averts gaze

Dogs will tend to lick their lips when they are nervous. A combination of all three of the above movements can indicate trouble ahead.

Raised fur

The hairs on the back of the dog suddenly become raised erect and the dog may even smell differently as odors from glands are released.

Dog with hackles raised and other signs

Whiskers twitch

Due to tension in the body and the face, a dog’s whiskers will begin to twitch.

If you observe any of the above 9 behaviors in a dog, remain motionless, do not run or scream, and avoid direct eye contact with the dog. Especially if you are encountering a large dog, it is easy to get knocked over by the dog. If you are knocked over, it is best to roll yourself into a ball covering your ears and neck with your hands and arms.  Continue to avoid making eye contact with the dog.

 

How to prevent yourself from being bitten by a dog

Once you recognize the signs that a dog is about to bite, what can you do to prevent provoking this behavior in the first place?  One initial suggestion is not to approach a dog that is unfamiliar to you. Secondly, you should not run away from a dog, or appear to be panicked.  If you are approached by an unfamiliar dog, do not move, run, or scream, and make sure you don’t make direct eye contact.  Thirdly, you should never disturb a dog if she is eating, sleeping, or when caring for puppies.  Fourthly, don’t pet a dog before she has had a chance to sniff and smell you.  Following this, you should never pat her on the head, instead just scratch her under the chin. Finally, it is never advisable to engage in rough, aggressive play with a dog.

Steps to take to prevent your dog biting others

We’ve considered what to do about being bitten by someone else’s dog, but how can you stop your own dog from being a threat to you and your family or to others.  Before choosing a dog for your family pet, try to do as much research as possible and ask a professional such as a vet or a dog trainer, so that you can find the breed that best meets your family’s needs.  In addition to looking at dog temperament and exercise requirements, you should also consider that certain breeds have much stronger bites than others.  Bite strength is measured in pound-force per square inch (PSI).  Examples of breeds with the strongest bite are the Kangal and the Doberman.

 

Kangal
Kangal

 

If you are considering adopting a rescue dog, you may not know much about the dog’s history or whether it has aggressive tendencies.  In this case, it is better to spend plenty of time with the dog before adopting him, to make sure the dog is a good fit for your home.  This is especially important if you have young children at home or if you have relatives or friends with young children regularly coming to your home.

When you decide on a dog, make sure you exercise your dog regularly to build bonds, reduce excess energy, and to keep your dog mentally stimulated.  Ensure that your puppy has proper socialization with exposure to as many different people and different situations as possible.  Train your dog so that he understands and responds to basic training commands.

It’s important to educate children on how to behave with dogs appropriately so that they are not bringing out aggression in the dog. Don’t play wrestling games or tug of war games with your dog and don’t allow children to play roughly with him either.

Finally, spaying or neutering dogs helps to reduce aggression and is highly recommended if you are not a dog breeder.

 

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Chaos in the Cubicles, or a Calm Company: Does a pets-at-work Policy Work?

Of the many holidays scheduled throughout the year, one of the newest to hit the calendar is National Take Your Pet to Work Day.  In the US this is scheduled for June 23rd in 2017.  If your company is considering getting involved in this or implementing a full pets-at-work policy, now might be the prime time to start preparing to make it work for your business and its employees.

Increasingly businesses across the US are becoming more dog friendly.  According to the US pet food company, Purina, although around 72% of companies do not allow employees to bring their pets to work, it is anticipated that this could change in coming years as some employers are seeing specific advantages from introducing this additional employee benefit.  Admittedly there are many working situations where it simply is not practical to have a dog in tow, but in certain office environments, it can be a feasible option.

Why become dog friendly?

A happy, relaxed employee is more likely to be motivated at work and more likely to stay with a company for longer. High employee turnover is never a good sign in any organization and smart employers know that losing good people costs them both in time and money.  A recent article by Julie Kantorindicated that employee turnover costs a company conservatively between $15,000 and $25,000 every time an employee on a low salary leaves to go elsewhere and this amount ratchets up quickly with higher salaried employees.  It stands to reason that employers who show employees that they are valued are likely to get more respect and a better work ethic in return. Ideas for businesses to keep staff content and engaged are varied and can include the following:

  • flexible working hours
  • benefits such as good healthcare coverage
  • telecommuting opportunities
  • on-site child care
  • access to exercise facilities at lunch time or after work
  • a pets-at-work policy

Any benefits that offer employees a better work-life balance tend to be well received. Amazon, Etsy, Google, Bissell, Clif Bar and Petco are just a few of the US companies that are keen to get pets involved. They believe that millennials especially (currently aged between 18 and 34 years old) are influenced in a positive way if there are dogs in the office. One company (the BrewDog brewery in Columbus, Ohio) has even introduced a paid parental leave plan for employees who are welcoming a new puppy into their homes. Following the parental leave, they are then permitted to bring the pup to work.

It doesn’t work for all, but for some companies, allowing staff this flexibility of having a pet at work can reap rewards.

 

dog-under-a-desk

 

What are the advantages of having dogs at work?

Benefits of having dogs at work can include some of the following:

A happier and healthier workforce. Employees with pets at the desk are less likely to suffer from depression as petting a dog releases endorphins, reducing anxiety in the owner. Having a dog around also encourages more physical activity.  With a dog at your feet, you have to get active during the day, by taking regular comfort breaks and walking before work, at lunchtime, and after work. These benefits are really only true for the dog owners among the staff and not necessarily applicable to those without pets.

Dogs get to spend more time with their owners and vice versa.  When you add your commute time to your working day, chances are you are away from your home for a lot longer than you may realize.  Many pet owners who work full time will hire dog walkers to take the dog out for a walk during the day, but even with that special attention it is usually only for a short amount of time during the day, so your dog is likely to be lonely and miss your presence.  If your dog is with you, he may be less stressed and you can also relax knowing that he is in your care.

Increased social interaction.  Having a pet around can break the ice between co-workers and can also help to improve communication between staff at different levels. If there are other dogs in the office, your dog may get the opportunity to socialize more with other dogs.

 

Young woman petting dog at office desk

How can employers get this policy started?

If you are thinking about implementing a pets-at-work policy there are several things to consider from the outset.

  • It’s not always easy to get commercial real estate that allows pets to be on the premises, so be sure there isn’t a “no-pets” policy in your building.
  • If you are thinking about adopting a pets-at-work policy at your workplace, a good way to start could be with a “Bring Your Pet to Work Day.”  This allows you to see how having animals around affects your work environment without having to commit to a full pet-friendly policy from the outset.
  • Talk to other organizations that have a pets-at-work policy and find out from them what works, what hasn’t worked, and why.
  • If you decide to invite pets into your workplace, be prepared to make revisions to the policy as you experience different situations during a working week or month.

How can employees make it work?

man-with-dog-on-lap

If the company gives the idea of dogs at work the go-ahead, employees who want to bring dogs should think about the best approach to ensure that they and the company can capture all the positive benefits.

Will it be OK with all coworkers in the office?  Some people are allergic to dogs, whereas others are downright fearful, so it’s important to be respectful of all employees needs.

What to do when dogs don’t get along. Chances are there will be plenty of other dogs at the office too.  If there are, introduce them slowly.  Not all will get on with one another, so be prepared for that and have a plan on what to do should that be the case.

Consider dog temperaments and how they differ with breed and training. Some dogs are too stressed in new settings to cope with going into a work environment, whereas others are fairly laid back and could fit in anywhere.  Think realistically and objectively about where your dog sits on this scale in terms of temperament and level of training.

Think about grooming. In the same way that you take a shower and dress appropriately for work, you should take a similar approach with your dog.  Make sure he is groomed as well as he can be – a muddy pooch may not be a good fit in a well-presented office environment.

Health and safety for dogs.  Ensure that the office environment is as hazard-free as possible. Make sure that any choking hazards are out of the way of the pets, and there is no chance of them chewing on cables, plants or anything else that could be dangerous. Ensure all pet vaccinations are up to date.  This is vital, to ensure that pets stay healthy when coming into contact with other dogs. Do not take a sick dog to work. You don’t know how that is going to play out, and this can be made worse when introducing him into a more stressful environment.

Don’t let him wander.  Although your dog wouldn’t be on a leash at home, this is not the same kind of environment.  You need to know where your dog is at every point during the day and the best way of doing that is keeping him tethered.

Pay attention to physical needs. Your dog will require regular attention during your time at work.  Make sure you have dishes for water and food with you and some (preferably non-squeaky) toys for distraction.  Take your dog for frequent excursions outside, so that he can relieve himself and so he doesn’t get overly restless being cooped up in an office environment all day.  Again, this is a time to consider whether your dog’s breed can tolerate being inside an office for a long period of time.

Don’t leave your dog unattended for large periods of time.  This can be difficult if you are likely to be attending lengthy meetings, so take that into consideration before bringing your dog to work.

 

Dog in glasses sitting in an office chair, on with box folder with documents

Do you think having your pet at work would make you more productive?  If you work somewhere that already welcomes pets in the workplace, we’d love to hear about your experiences.

Reference

  1. Kantor J. Want to Keep Your Millenials – Mentor Them.  Huff Post. December 18, 2016

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Love Me, Love My Dog!

Change can be hard.  This is true for people and dogs alike and as we progress through our lives with inevitable changes along the way, we may encounter some interesting situations with our loved ones, whether human or canine. Dating or embarking on a new relationship can be one of those times.  Relationships are complex and if there are animals involved, things can get more complicated. A study published in a British newspaper in 2012suggested that dogs can cause more than 2,000 arguments in a household over the dog’s lifetime. In a poll conducted in October 2010 by the Associated Press-Petside,approximately 14% of people would choose their dog over their own spouse.  These remarkable statistics prove that Shakespeare was not wrong and “the course of true love never did run smooth.”3  If you’re reading this and seeing some parallels with your own life, what can be done to make things a little less choppy?

Is your partner a dog lover?

a-house-is-not-a-homeWhether your partner is a dog lover or not is a question that ideally needs to be answered at the beginning of a relationship, because if he is not and you are, there could be trouble ahead.  Some people cannot possibly imagine being without a dog in their home, whereas others cannot imagine sharing their home with a pet.  It can be very difficult for someone who does not like (or is perhaps afraid of) dogs to adjust to having a pet in his or her space. If your partner is allergic to pets, it can be downright disastrous. A dog sensing fear or dislike from your partner does not make for a comfortable situation. Determining what will work for you both at the outset, could be a smart move in the long term.

Blending households

Introducing a new person into a household can be extremely confusing for dogs who are pack animals and enjoy the comfort of knowing where everyone sits in the pecking order.  Your dog’s home is his territory and he will protect that territory as much as possible. Introduce a partner gradually with initial contact being on neutral ground.  By the time you get to the moving-in stage, your partner and your pet should be very used to being around one another. When the partner does move in, try to make sure that the pet’s normal sleeping areas are not compromised, as dogs are creatures of habit and will not necessarily feel comfortable with lots of change.  If you are blending households that both contain pets, you have another variable to add to the equation.  Again, make sure that initial pet introductions are done on neutral ground.  The pets should be very familiar with each other before living under the same roof.

cake-topper

Compromise

For many dog owners, the dog is often treated like a substitute child or grandchild, but just as parents would with regard to raising children, owners should discuss how they both feel about dealing with training, behavioral issues, and how much time, money, and attention should be devoted to the dog.  As with any relationship, compromises should be made while respecting wishes on either side.  Disputes over the dog can include who should walk the dog, where the dog sits in your vehicle, money spent on the dog, feeding the dog from the table, or damage caused by the dog, to name just a few.  Sit down with your partner and determine what the issues are in your household and how you can resolve them. For example, pets on the furniture may be acceptable to one person, but not to the other.  This is particularly an issue if you like your dog to share the bed, but your partner doesn’t. Talk about what you can both tolerate and when you decide on a household rule, stick to it.

dogs-on-the-bed-cartoon

Don’t expect your partner to love your pet as much as you do.  As long as your pet is treated well by your partner and your pet is friendly in return, that can be OK.  Try to share out tasks involved in the care of your pet between you, but if your partner is just not keen, be prepared (and content) to take on the lion’s share of the work.

Coping with jealousy

You mean everything to your dog and you mean everything to your partner! Sometimes it can be difficult for your dog and for your significant other to see affection being directed elsewhere.  Don’t neglect to spend time with your dog after your partner has moved in and try to ensure that your partner also builds a relationship with your dog by spending time, giving treats and other attention.

Tackle issues before they escalate

If your normally well-behaved dog starts acting out or behaving badly, that could be a sign that your pup is not happy with the new situation.  Don’t allow your dog to get away with bad behavior, and try to tackle the issue as soon as possible.  It may be that you need to call on the help of an expert, whether a trainer or a veterinarian, to see if there is an underlying concern that needs addressing.

Whatever the problems that you encounter, don’t just let them fester.  Communicate with your partner so you are aware of each other’s feelings.  If you are comfortable talking with friends about your situation, they might be able to assist in problem resolution. If this doesn’t help or is not a good option for you, a licensed marriage and family therapist, who will be familiar with these kinds of issues, could help steer your relationship to a better place.

If you’ve had some pup-induced relationship challenges, why not share how you were able to resolve them?

Sending love to all our Pet Barrier blog readers this Valentine’s Day.

dog-with-rose-in-mouth
Hope your Valentine’s Day is pawsome!

References

  1. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2084835/Mans-worst-friend-Average-dog-causes-2-000-family-arguments-lifetime.html#ixzz4W2PLYhQ2
  2. http://www.apgfkpoll.com October 2010.
  3. Shakespeare, W. A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Act 1, Scene 1. 1600.