Five dog-specific apps to Help you Live Better

Today, there are mobile apps for almost every conceivable topic or need and because so many people now own smartphones and tablets, mobile app usage has seen huge growth worldwide.  It is estimated that by 2020, mobile apps will generate a staggering $189 billion worldwide.1 

There are some really interesting apps that have been developed specifically for dog owners.  We’ve taken a look at five free apps (all available for Android and iOS), which could potentially assist dog owners with many aspects of dog care.

Dog Vacay

Despite the boom in dog-friendly hotel options across the nation, there are times when you need to travel but just can’t take your favorite companion with you.  Although there are excellent kennels available in the US, some people prefer their dogs to have a more personalized pet-sitting service and this led to the development of the DogVacay app.

Dog Vacay allows you to connect with dog sitters in your area who offer services ranging from dog walking, to taking your dog to vet appointments, or caring for your dog in your home or theirs when you are out of town.

With a 24/7 customer support service and daily photo or video updates, you can travel or use the daycare option knowing that your dog is in good hands.

dog-vacay
Pet First Aid

Just like people, pets get sick and have accidents too.  Although many of us are familiar with the correct first aid procedures when dealing with people, we’re not necessarily as confident when required to be first responders in pet emergencies. The Pet First Aid app developed by the American Red Cross remedies that situation, allowing you to check symptoms and watch videos on how best to respond to common emergency situations.

You can learn about early warning signs, learn first aid steps, and take quizzes on pet health and safety. For more serious conditions, the app will also tell you the location of the nearest emergency animal hospital or veterinarian’s office.

A great app to use in emergencies and a great resource to help you provide emergency care for your pet until you can get to a veterinarian.

pet-first-aid

BarkCam

If you’re a dog owner, you will know that no matter how adorable your dog’s appearance, trying to capture “that look” in a photo can be extremely difficult.  This is where BarkCam comes in.  Using a variety of different sounds to get your dog’s attention, the sounds are linked to the camera’s shutter button, so you trigger sound and take the photo at the same time.

When you’ve got your favorite picture, you can edit to your heart’s content using filters, stickers or even text.  You can share pictures on the platform itself or share it on either Instagram, Facebook or Twitter.

bark-cam

Whistle

This app requires a phone for you and a Whistle GPS collar for your dog, which then allows you to track not only your dog’s location but also his heart rate.  Designed to help avoid dog’s getting lost, it also allows you to create custom activity goals for your dog, based on breed, size, and age and can be modified depending on which family member is walking the dog at that particular time.

It is important to keep in mind that because this app has nationwide GPS coverage in the US, there is potential to run down your phone battery much faster on longer walks.

Although this app is free, the required collar costs around $50*.

 

whistle-device
Whistle GPS dog collar

 

 

MapMyDogWalk

There are plenty of apps on the market for runners and walkers and this app is quite similar, but designed specifically for those who walk dogs. The app gives you information on the best dog walking routes in your area and if you use one of these or add one of your own, the app allows you to track progress made and allows you to save this data to compare against future walks. Information on dog parks, waste-bag dispensers, dog-friendly areas and water fountains are all given in this dog-friendly app.
Once again, it is important to note that continually using GPS, does dramatically drain battery power.

map-my-dog-walk

 

We have only taken a look at 5 free apps, but there are far more on the market for dog owners to use. Why not look for one that would make your lifestyle easier?  As businesses are increasingly being encouraged to develop apps, it is possible that in the not too distant future we will see an even greater number of dog-friendly apps, which will likely become more interactive and more personalized to meet user need.

Do you currently use any apps on your cell phone or tablet that make your dog care duties more manageable or is there an app that you would love to see available for dog owners? Let us know which apps make your life with your dog better.

*Price correct at time of article posting.

References

  1. https://www.statista.com/topics/1002/mobile-app-usage/

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Why we Want US Healthcare to go to the Dogs

Have you ever had to spend any time in the hospital as a patient?  If you have, it is likely that you may have experienced periods of feeling low, anxious, stressed, and frustrated as a result of your illness or injury and because of being away from family, friends, and your home. If any of this sounds like your hospital experience, you were not alone, as it is not uncommon for hospitalized patients to experience a downturn in mental wellbeing, sometimes with physiological changes too.

In order to counteract some of these multi-factor stressors that hospitalized patients experience, many hospitals have introduced a variety of therapeutic programs.  One program that you are increasingly likely to see on that list is animal-assisted therapy sometimes simply called pet therapy.

Why is animal-assisted therapy being used?

The idea of animal-assisted therapy is not new.  For many years, it was considered to be a “nice” thing for hospital patients to experience, but thanks to increasing amounts of research into the topic by clinicians, there has been proven to be a wider range of benefits.

boy-with-pet-therapy-dog

What are the benefits of animal-assisted therapy to patients?

An article by Cole, Gawlinski, Steers, and Kotlerman1 in the American Journal of Critical Care showed that when patients had only a 12-minute visit from a pet, there was an improvement in heart and lung function and a significant lowering of blood pressure, a reduction in the release of harmful hormones, and a decrease in anxiety.  The study was conducted with hospitalized heart failure patients. It indicated that there was far more benefit shown in those patients that received a visit from a pet than in those patients who were only visited by a human volunteer or those who were left alone.

Specifically, the benefits to patients of animal-assisted therapy include:

Mental health benefits

  • Reduced depression
  • Reduced problem behaviors for patients with dementia (less agitation, less verbal aggression, and more social behavior)
  • Reduced fatigue
  • Reduced tension
  • Reduced confusion
  • Improved self-esteem and self-acceptance
  • Increased socialization
  • Reduced boredom

Physical health benefits

  • Lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure when exposed to stress
  • Reduced serum epinephrine concentrations
  • Lower pain perception
  • Endorphins (oxytocin) released giving a calming effect
  • Reduced need for medication

man-petting-dog-in-hospital

What are the dangers for patients?

If patients are allergic to pets, animal-assisted therapy cannot be used. Guidelines from the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) indicate that only dogs should be used, not cats. Cats cannot be trained in the same way as dogs, with more likelihood of scratches and bites from cats.  Additionally, people are more likely to be allergic to cats than to dogs.

There has been a lot of research done on the benefit of having dogs in the hospital, but not much research on the spread of bacteria from having dogs in the hospital rooms. The SHEA developed new guidelines for how hospitals can approach having pets visiting with patients at the hospital. Dogs used for pet therapy purposes and their handlers need to undergo specific training and be evaluated prior to having hospital access and ideally should be certified by a pet training organization. The American Kennel Club (AKC) lists the organizations through which it accepts dogs to have received their certification and to be given the official title of AKC Therapy Dog.

A study done in a Canadian hospital tested dogs’ paws and fur prior to hospital entry and then again after visiting patients.  Of the 26 dogs studied, one picked up C Difficile on his paws during the visit and one had MRSA on his fur and on the handler’s hands following the visit.2 This highlights that although sanitizing pets is difficult, there is a definite need for thorough handwashing by anyone visiting patients prior to visiting and following the visit. When visiting with multiple patients, handwashing between visits is essential.

Hospitals have very distinct protocols in place to ensure that the transmission of infection is kept at a minimum. The animals have to be clean, vaccinated, trained, and have a good temperament before being allowed into the hospital in the first place.  In some cases, such as patients in isolation units or patients in the intensive care unit, pet therapy can only take place with extra measures in place, but in certain situations it is unsuitable.

lady-receiving-pet-therapy

Examples of successful animal-assisted therapy?

There are two types of patient-pet interactions: animal-assisted therapy and animal-assisted activity. Animal-assisted therapy is specifically directed toward patients with cancer, heart disease, or mental health concerns and needs to have a credentialed staff member involved in the process.  Animal-assisted activities have a wider scope and are typically used to provide comfort and enjoyment focusing on mental health benefits rather than trying to achieve specific physiological outcomes such as reduced blood pressure, etc. This latter form of activity is typically staffed by volunteer handlers.

Memorial Sloane Kettering Cancer Center in New York City is an example of a hospital where canines have successfully been introduced in the Caring Canines program.

 

memorial-sloane-kettering-caring-canines
President of Memorial Sloane Kettering Cancer Center with Caring Canines employees

 

There are many programs of a similar type being introduced across the nation as the full benefits are increasingly being understood.  Dogs are not only being used in surgical and treatment settings but are being used for physical therapy and rehabilitation. Tasks such as brushing a dog can make for more interesting arm strengthening exercises for patients than just doing weight training.3  Dogs can also be used to encourage walking and other rehabilitative exercises.

More and more research is being done on the subject of pet therapy to ascertain the relative merits.  Here at Pet Barrier, we think the answer is simple.  If having a therapy or activity session with a dog can at the bare minimum brighten a patient’s day during difficult times, pet therapy is absolutely worth it. It has been clinically proven that animal-assisted therapy achieves far more than that, with benefits to patients’ mental and physical health being achieved across all age groups, from children through to seniors.  Animal-assisted therapy and activity should be available at all healthcare facilities across the nation. Is US healthcare going to the dogs? We welcome it!

We’d love to hear about your experiences with pet therapy – please share if you are able.

References

1.       Gole, Gawlinski, Steers, Kotlerman. Animal-Assisted Therapy in Patients Hospitalized With Heart Failure. Am J Crit Care. November 2007 vol. 16 no. 6 575-585

2. https://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/05/11/therapy-dogs-and-hospital-infections/?_r=0 Tara Parker-Pope May 11, 2009

3. Haggard, A. (1985). A patient’s best friend. American Journal of Nursing. 85(12), 1374-1376

 

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Why Mom was Right About Spring Cleaning: Part 1, Grooming

 

Do the words “Spring Cleaning” make you roll your eyes and think of  The Stepford Wives, bleach, and enormous rubber gloves?  If the answer to this is yes, you’re not alone. Although it is common and often necessary to look at giving our homes an extra deep clean at this time of year, other aspects of our lives could potentially benefit from a good spring clean too. This 3-part series looks at a few facets of our lives where a little extra TLC could be worthwhile.

Part 1: Grooming Dogs

During the wetter and colder months, dogs tend to get more dirty, more frequently.  If your pocketbook is still feeling a little light after the holiday season, making extra visits to the groomer may not be a practical option.  To keep your dog healthy and smelling fresh, a more intensive session of at-home grooming may be the answer.

dog-in-bath

Don’t Give Brushing the Brush Off

Although a relatively simple task, the benefits of brushing shouldn’t be ignored. Brushing is excellent for your dog’s coat as it removes any dead hair and avoids mats.  It also helps to distribute the natural oils within the coat, which keeps the coat healthy and looking good too. Most dogs are quite happy to be brushed, but the frequency and duration will depend on the dog’s breed – some will require extensive brushing as part of the daily routine while others will not need brushing as frequently or for as long.  Check what is required for your breed, but also bear in mind that brushing is a fantastic way to bond with your dog, so you may want to brush him more frequently than the bare minimum requirement.

brushing-a-dogs-coat

Splish, Splash

Unlike people, dogs do not need a daily bath.  Experts recommend once a month (unless there is a medical condition), as more frequent bathing strips the coat of the natural oils necessary to keep it shiny and healthy.  Never use shampoo or conditioners designed for humans.  There are plenty of dog shampoos on the market that have been specifically formulated to avoid irritating your pet’s skin, to remove dirt but not the important oils from their coats, and to be easily rinsed from the fur.

After removing your dog’s collar, clean your dog’s ears with an ear cleanser before placing her in the bath, and then gently place cotton balls in her ears to keep them dry during the bathing process.  Use warm water, checking the temperature on your own skin first and then thoroughly saturate the coat. Shampoo the dirtier areas first, working up to the head last, using your hands to massage the skin through the coat.  Use a washcloth to remove dirt from the face. Rinse your dog’s head first and then work down the body, keeping water and shampoo away from the eyes and face where possible. When you rinse the shampoo from the coat, ensure that you rinse all of it out thoroughly to prevent itchy skin. Following up with a leave-in conditioner can be helpful so the coat is more manageable and so it doesn’t get dirty again too quickly. Comb out your dog’s fur while it is wet to prevent tangles – you may find that a detangling spray will help with that also.

dog-in-bath

Drying your dog after a bath can be a challenge, as some dogs (mine included) may enjoy the bathing process, but hate the feeling of being wet after a bath.  One way is to take the natural drying approach, allowing the dog to shake the water from his coat and then letting the coat air dry.  Impressively dogs can shake about 70% of the water from their fur in this way. If you don’t want that amount of water sprayed around your bathroom, towelling your dog dry is probably the way to go.  For those that cannot even tolerate the towel-dry wet feeling, following up with a hair dryer is helpful.  Not all dogs enjoy having a hair dryer blown at them, so if it is a new experience for your dog, introduce her gradually being sure to keep heat and air moving over the entire dog and not concentrated in one area as that could be uncomfortable or even burn skin. If your dog resists the hair dryer or is visibly fearful, just stick to the towel method.

dog-shaking-water-out-of-coat

Keeping Those  Pearly Whites Clean

Ideally, brushing your dog’s teeth should be part of your daily routine.  Use toothpaste specifically formulated for dogs – do not use human toothpaste as the fluoride is toxic to dogs.  In the real world however, no matter how much we love our pets and want the best for their health, incorporating daily brushing of their teeth into our hectic schedules often doesn’t happen.  There are other ways to keep your dog’s teeth clean and breath fresher. One way is to give your dog raw bones, which are excellent for a dog’s teeth, but never give chicken bones or other fragile bones that can splinter easily.  Dental treats can be used as an alternative to regular treats.  Be careful of weight gain in your pet if using these, as some are quite high in calories.

If your dog’s breath smells bad, there is plaque still building up around the gums, your dog has lumps or bumps in the mouth or bleeding gums, or you have other concerns with your dog’s oral health, you should turn to a veterinarian for assistance.

brushing-dogs-teeth

A mani-pedi

For some dogs, walking daily on a sidewalk is sufficient to keep nails at a decent length until a visit to the groomers is possible. For others, this just isn’t sufficient, but many dog owners are fearful of trimming their dog’s nails in case they do it incorrectly.  If your dog has regularly had his nails clipped from a young age, he is probably quite comfortable with the procedure.  Talk to your vet about the best way to trim the nails so that they remain at a manageable length in between groomer visits. Don’t forget the dewclaw, if your dog’s breed has them.

nail-trim-guide

A buzz cut or bangs?

This is another area of dog care that many owners prefer to leave to the professionals, especially if your dog’s breed requires hand stripping.  Again, depending on your dog’s breed, you may be able to tackle some trimming at home, so talk to your vet about how frequently your dog needs its fur trimmed and by how much. If you are feeling brave and decide to have a go, make sure clippers and scissors are sharp, choose a location without distractions and remember that many dogs will get restless quickly, so make it brief.

under-the-dryer

 

Lots of self-service dog wash stores have opened up across the United States over the last few years. These are more expensive than washing your dog in your own home, but are considerably cheaper than taking your dog to a groomer.  Self-service dog washes give you the convenience and ease of using professional-grade grooming equipment to groom your pooch effectively – you can often grab a latte there too!

Wherever you choose to do it, grooming your pet is not only good for the dog’s health and hygiene but provides a great bonding process between owner and dog.  Regular grooming enables the owner to be aware (more quickly) of any health changes that their pet is experiencing. So, Mom was right about spring cleaning, to not only keep your dog fresher and healthier, but hopefully by your side for that bit longer.

Why don’t you share any tips you have for making grooming a fun experience for you and your pooch?

 

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Chaos in the Cubicles, or a Calm Company: Does a pets-at-work Policy Work?

Of the many holidays scheduled throughout the year, one of the newest to hit the calendar is National Take Your Pet to Work Day.  In the US this is scheduled for June 23rd in 2017.  If your company is considering getting involved in this or implementing a full pets-at-work policy, now might be the prime time to start preparing to make it work for your business and its employees.

Increasingly businesses across the US are becoming more dog friendly.  According to the US pet food company, Purina, although around 72% of companies do not allow employees to bring their pets to work, it is anticipated that this could change in coming years as some employers are seeing specific advantages from introducing this additional employee benefit.  Admittedly there are many working situations where it simply is not practical to have a dog in tow, but in certain office environments, it can be a feasible option.

Why become dog friendly?

A happy, relaxed employee is more likely to be motivated at work and more likely to stay with a company for longer. High employee turnover is never a good sign in any organization and smart employers know that losing good people costs them both in time and money.  A recent article by Julie Kantorindicated that employee turnover costs a company conservatively between $15,000 and $25,000 every time an employee on a low salary leaves to go elsewhere and this amount ratchets up quickly with higher salaried employees.  It stands to reason that employers who show employees that they are valued are likely to get more respect and a better work ethic in return. Ideas for businesses to keep staff content and engaged are varied and can include the following:

  • flexible working hours
  • benefits such as good healthcare coverage
  • telecommuting opportunities
  • on-site child care
  • access to exercise facilities at lunch time or after work
  • a pets-at-work policy

Any benefits that offer employees a better work-life balance tend to be well received. Amazon, Etsy, Google, Bissell, Clif Bar and Petco are just a few of the US companies that are keen to get pets involved. They believe that millennials especially (currently aged between 18 and 34 years old) are influenced in a positive way if there are dogs in the office. One company (the BrewDog brewery in Columbus, Ohio) has even introduced a paid parental leave plan for employees who are welcoming a new puppy into their homes. Following the parental leave, they are then permitted to bring the pup to work.

It doesn’t work for all, but for some companies, allowing staff this flexibility of having a pet at work can reap rewards.

 

dog-under-a-desk

 

What are the advantages of having dogs at work?

Benefits of having dogs at work can include some of the following:

A happier and healthier workforce. Employees with pets at the desk are less likely to suffer from depression as petting a dog releases endorphins, reducing anxiety in the owner. Having a dog around also encourages more physical activity.  With a dog at your feet, you have to get active during the day, by taking regular comfort breaks and walking before work, at lunchtime, and after work. These benefits are really only true for the dog owners among the staff and not necessarily applicable to those without pets.

Dogs get to spend more time with their owners and vice versa.  When you add your commute time to your working day, chances are you are away from your home for a lot longer than you may realize.  Many pet owners who work full time will hire dog walkers to take the dog out for a walk during the day, but even with that special attention it is usually only for a short amount of time during the day, so your dog is likely to be lonely and miss your presence.  If your dog is with you, he may be less stressed and you can also relax knowing that he is in your care.

Increased social interaction.  Having a pet around can break the ice between co-workers and can also help to improve communication between staff at different levels. If there are other dogs in the office, your dog may get the opportunity to socialize more with other dogs.

 

Young woman petting dog at office desk

How can employers get this policy started?

If you are thinking about implementing a pets-at-work policy there are several things to consider from the outset.

  • It’s not always easy to get commercial real estate that allows pets to be on the premises, so be sure there isn’t a “no-pets” policy in your building.
  • If you are thinking about adopting a pets-at-work policy at your workplace, a good way to start could be with a “Bring Your Pet to Work Day.”  This allows you to see how having animals around affects your work environment without having to commit to a full pet-friendly policy from the outset.
  • Talk to other organizations that have a pets-at-work policy and find out from them what works, what hasn’t worked, and why.
  • If you decide to invite pets into your workplace, be prepared to make revisions to the policy as you experience different situations during a working week or month.

How can employees make it work?

man-with-dog-on-lap

If the company gives the idea of dogs at work the go-ahead, employees who want to bring dogs should think about the best approach to ensure that they and the company can capture all the positive benefits.

Will it be OK with all coworkers in the office?  Some people are allergic to dogs, whereas others are downright fearful, so it’s important to be respectful of all employees needs.

What to do when dogs don’t get along. Chances are there will be plenty of other dogs at the office too.  If there are, introduce them slowly.  Not all will get on with one another, so be prepared for that and have a plan on what to do should that be the case.

Consider dog temperaments and how they differ with breed and training. Some dogs are too stressed in new settings to cope with going into a work environment, whereas others are fairly laid back and could fit in anywhere.  Think realistically and objectively about where your dog sits on this scale in terms of temperament and level of training.

Think about grooming. In the same way that you take a shower and dress appropriately for work, you should take a similar approach with your dog.  Make sure he is groomed as well as he can be – a muddy pooch may not be a good fit in a well-presented office environment.

Health and safety for dogs.  Ensure that the office environment is as hazard-free as possible. Make sure that any choking hazards are out of the way of the pets, and there is no chance of them chewing on cables, plants or anything else that could be dangerous. Ensure all pet vaccinations are up to date.  This is vital, to ensure that pets stay healthy when coming into contact with other dogs. Do not take a sick dog to work. You don’t know how that is going to play out, and this can be made worse when introducing him into a more stressful environment.

Don’t let him wander.  Although your dog wouldn’t be on a leash at home, this is not the same kind of environment.  You need to know where your dog is at every point during the day and the best way of doing that is keeping him tethered.

Pay attention to physical needs. Your dog will require regular attention during your time at work.  Make sure you have dishes for water and food with you and some (preferably non-squeaky) toys for distraction.  Take your dog for frequent excursions outside, so that he can relieve himself and so he doesn’t get overly restless being cooped up in an office environment all day.  Again, this is a time to consider whether your dog’s breed can tolerate being inside an office for a long period of time.

Don’t leave your dog unattended for large periods of time.  This can be difficult if you are likely to be attending lengthy meetings, so take that into consideration before bringing your dog to work.

 

Dog in glasses sitting in an office chair, on with box folder with documents

Do you think having your pet at work would make you more productive?  If you work somewhere that already welcomes pets in the workplace, we’d love to hear about your experiences.

Reference

  1. Kantor J. Want to Keep Your Millenials – Mentor Them.  Huff Post. December 18, 2016

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Love Me, Love My Dog!

Change can be hard.  This is true for people and dogs alike and as we progress through our lives with inevitable changes along the way, we may encounter some interesting situations with our loved ones, whether human or canine. Dating or embarking on a new relationship can be one of those times.  Relationships are complex and if there are animals involved, things can get more complicated. A study published in a British newspaper in 2012suggested that dogs can cause more than 2,000 arguments in a household over the dog’s lifetime. In a poll conducted in October 2010 by the Associated Press-Petside,approximately 14% of people would choose their dog over their own spouse.  These remarkable statistics prove that Shakespeare was not wrong and “the course of true love never did run smooth.”3  If you’re reading this and seeing some parallels with your own life, what can be done to make things a little less choppy?

Is your partner a dog lover?

a-house-is-not-a-homeWhether your partner is a dog lover or not is a question that ideally needs to be answered at the beginning of a relationship, because if he is not and you are, there could be trouble ahead.  Some people cannot possibly imagine being without a dog in their home, whereas others cannot imagine sharing their home with a pet.  It can be very difficult for someone who does not like (or is perhaps afraid of) dogs to adjust to having a pet in his or her space. If your partner is allergic to pets, it can be downright disastrous. A dog sensing fear or dislike from your partner does not make for a comfortable situation. Determining what will work for you both at the outset, could be a smart move in the long term.

Blending households

Introducing a new person into a household can be extremely confusing for dogs who are pack animals and enjoy the comfort of knowing where everyone sits in the pecking order.  Your dog’s home is his territory and he will protect that territory as much as possible. Introduce a partner gradually with initial contact being on neutral ground.  By the time you get to the moving-in stage, your partner and your pet should be very used to being around one another. When the partner does move in, try to make sure that the pet’s normal sleeping areas are not compromised, as dogs are creatures of habit and will not necessarily feel comfortable with lots of change.  If you are blending households that both contain pets, you have another variable to add to the equation.  Again, make sure that initial pet introductions are done on neutral ground.  The pets should be very familiar with each other before living under the same roof.

cake-topper

Compromise

For many dog owners, the dog is often treated like a substitute child or grandchild, but just as parents would with regard to raising children, owners should discuss how they both feel about dealing with training, behavioral issues, and how much time, money, and attention should be devoted to the dog.  As with any relationship, compromises should be made while respecting wishes on either side.  Disputes over the dog can include who should walk the dog, where the dog sits in your vehicle, money spent on the dog, feeding the dog from the table, or damage caused by the dog, to name just a few.  Sit down with your partner and determine what the issues are in your household and how you can resolve them. For example, pets on the furniture may be acceptable to one person, but not to the other.  This is particularly an issue if you like your dog to share the bed, but your partner doesn’t. Talk about what you can both tolerate and when you decide on a household rule, stick to it.

dogs-on-the-bed-cartoon

Don’t expect your partner to love your pet as much as you do.  As long as your pet is treated well by your partner and your pet is friendly in return, that can be OK.  Try to share out tasks involved in the care of your pet between you, but if your partner is just not keen, be prepared (and content) to take on the lion’s share of the work.

Coping with jealousy

You mean everything to your dog and you mean everything to your partner! Sometimes it can be difficult for your dog and for your significant other to see affection being directed elsewhere.  Don’t neglect to spend time with your dog after your partner has moved in and try to ensure that your partner also builds a relationship with your dog by spending time, giving treats and other attention.

Tackle issues before they escalate

If your normally well-behaved dog starts acting out or behaving badly, that could be a sign that your pup is not happy with the new situation.  Don’t allow your dog to get away with bad behavior, and try to tackle the issue as soon as possible.  It may be that you need to call on the help of an expert, whether a trainer or a veterinarian, to see if there is an underlying concern that needs addressing.

Whatever the problems that you encounter, don’t just let them fester.  Communicate with your partner so you are aware of each other’s feelings.  If you are comfortable talking with friends about your situation, they might be able to assist in problem resolution. If this doesn’t help or is not a good option for you, a licensed marriage and family therapist, who will be familiar with these kinds of issues, could help steer your relationship to a better place.

If you’ve had some pup-induced relationship challenges, why not share how you were able to resolve them?

Sending love to all our Pet Barrier blog readers this Valentine’s Day.

dog-with-rose-in-mouth
Hope your Valentine’s Day is pawsome!

References

  1. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2084835/Mans-worst-friend-Average-dog-causes-2-000-family-arguments-lifetime.html#ixzz4W2PLYhQ2
  2. http://www.apgfkpoll.com October 2010.
  3. Shakespeare, W. A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Act 1, Scene 1. 1600.

Manners Matter: Etiquette at Pet-Friendly Hotels

Dreaming of your next vacation?  When you start making firmer plans, why not include your dog?  Only 10 years ago, if you wanted to stay in a hotel, it was a little difficult to take your dog with you on vacation, but things have definitely changed for the better for dog owners. With far more hotels accommodating pets, people are increasingly welcoming the opportunity to take their canine friends with them on their adventures.

Regardless of whether you are going to be staying in a 5-star resort, or a basic motel room, it is important that the way you (and your pet) behave will ensure that pets will always be welcome at these hotels.  So, what is the best way of achieving your dream vacation and ensuring you will be able to return for future visits if desired?

kid-and-dog-in-hotel-room

Before you go

When you make your reservation, ensure that the hotel is aware that you will be bringing a dog or multiple dogs.  This is important as pet-friendly hotels also welcome those without pets, so you may get a more dog-friendly room location if you can let the hotel know about your dogs ahead of time. Be aware that although some hotels allow dogs to stay free, others have additional charges and these fees can vary greatly from one hotel to another. Make sure you know exactly what the fees are ahead of your visit and whether the charge is per room or per dog. Ask how many dogs are permitted in your room. There may be a one-dog or two-dog limit per room, so do check on that if you want to have multiple animals with you.

At certain hotels, although dogs are welcome, they may not be permitted to remain in the hotel room unattended.  If that is the case for the hotel you are interested in, ask about local pet sitting services for days when you cannot take your dog with you on excursions.

Some hotels, particularly the larger chains, may offer a pet welcome package with items such as dog bowls, pet food mats, and dog treats, but not all do. It is preferable to bring your own pet food, and bedding as this allows the dog to feel at home right away with familiar tastes and scents to provide comfort and reduce her stress levels.  If your dog sleeps in a crate at home, try to bring it with you. Don’t forget to add waste collection bags to your packing list too!

 Checking-in

FlLovesDogs

If you arrive at the hotel by car, make sure your dog has traveled there securely at the rear of the vehicle. It can be a shock for the valet to open the car door and have an unrestrained pet leap out.

Inform the hotel staff at check-in that you have your dog with you. This is a good time to find out where they prefer guests to take their dogs to go potty. Also find out if there are areas of the hotel that are no-go zones for dogs. The concierge is a mine of information, so take the opportunity to ask about dog-friendly restaurants, beaches, or other attractions in the surrounding area.

During the stay

dog-in-hotel-room

Check your room for any hazards and put these out of reach of your pet. If your dog has a penchant for drinking from the toilet, try to keep him away from the one in the hotel room as the chemicals used could be toxic.

Follow all the rules and regulations set by the hotel.  They have been set for a reason, so please respect them. Just because the hotel is pet-friendly doesn’t mean that there will be access to all areas. Don’t take your dog to areas of the hotel that are off-limits. If pets are allowed in the dining areas, do not allow your dog to eat from the plates.

You may be a dog lover, but not all people are. Chances are that in a pet-friendly hotel the staff are likely to be comfortable with animals and happy to be around them, but the same may not be true of the other hotel guests. Be respectful of other guests by keeping your dog at a distance, unless they are keen to introduce themselves to your dog. For everyone’s benefit, try to ensure that your dog does not bark incessantly in your hotel room or in common areas of the hotel.

Plan to take your pet out on excursions with you where possible, but there may be some days where that is not possible.  On those days, and if the hotel permits dogs being left in rooms, the following tips may help to ensure your pooch is content during your absence.

  • Leave the lights on, so your pet is not alone in the dark.
  • Leave the TV on during the day, to keep your dog relaxed and distract him from noise in the hallway.
  • Ensure that your pet is left with plenty of fresh water.
  • Make sure your dog is not bored when you are out.  Items such as chew toys and treat puzzle balls can help distract a dog from your absence and ensure that he chews on them and not the furniture in the room.
  • Keep your pet leashed or crated when you are out of the room

treat-puzzle-ball

On vacation, your daily routine may be dramatically different from usual, but don’t neglect to walk your dog in the way you would at home.  If your dog normally requires two long walks every day, then do the same while on vacation.  It’ll be good for you too!

Checking-out

At check-in, you will probably have been required to leave credit card details to which a security deposit may have been added.  Be honest and if your pet has caused any damage, report it and be prepared to pay for repairs.

It might also be helpful to leave a tip for the housekeeping staff, who may have had extra work to do in your room.

dog-on-bell-boy-cart

Stop dreaming about your next vacation and make it a reality. Wherever your travels take you, may your vacation be wonderful and memorable with your favorite pooch alongside. Keep the above tips in mind and keep America’s pet-friendly hotels pet friendly.

What experiences have you had when staying at hotels with your dog? We’d love to hear about them and see vacation pictures!

The 5 Biggest Puppy Care Blunders: Are you Guilty?

Whether you received a little bundle of fluff during the Holidays or you’re about to get a puppy as the weather starts to get warmer, you know that there’s going to be a lot of work and fun ahead of you.  Just like having a new baby at home, the first few weeks or months with a new puppy can be tiring and somewhat frustrating. So what are the biggest mistakes that new puppy owners make and how do you get on the right track to raising your new best friend to be an adorable, well-behaved adult?

beagle-puppies

Blunder 1

Not starting as you mean to go on

It’s important to remember that when raising a puppy, dogs think in terms of the dog pack hierarchy. For your dog, where every family member is part of a hierarchy that matters to him, he needs to see you as the pack leader or alpha (top ranked) in the household. You should eat first, go through a doorway first, sit and sleep in the best places in your home. By doing these simple things, your dog understands that you are the boss. It is very difficult to break undesirable habits, so it is better to begin as you mean to continue. You decide on the household rules and if you want your puppy to behave you need to not only enforce the rules but also stick to them. Be firm and consistent with your dog so he knows what you expect.

Blunder 2

Overlooking issues that affect health and safety

puppy-carrying-a-leash

It is so tempting to want to try out the new leash and introduce your lil’ buddy to the neighbors, but unless your pup has received all stages of vaccinations, it can threaten his health. Vaccinations are vitally important. Your puppy’s immune system is in its infancy and needs the protection of the vaccinations to prevent him from contracting diseases from other dogs. If you have an enclosed yard that is not accessed by dogs outside of your immediate family, that is absolutely fine, but don’t be tempted to go for walks yet as he will be susceptible to airborne infections or could even contract something from the sidewalk.  When all vaccinations are completed and you are ready to go out, make sure that your puppy also has a safe area to travel in your vehicle.  Placing him in the rear with a vehicle-specific pet barrier installed is one of the best options for avoiding driving distractions and giving your pup a secure, comfortable area.

travall-pet-barrier-and-divider

Blunder 3

Trying to be the Mom

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There is always going to be a certain amount of separation anxiety when a puppy leaves his mother, but your role is different and it is important to adopt your differing role from the outset.  A puppy should not be allowed to be by your side for every single minute of the day and night, or the separation anxiety will only increase into adulthood. There are many and varied approaches to training puppies. Crate training has become increasingly popular in recent years and for many it just makes sense.  One of the great reasons is that it gives the puppy his own private, safe space to which he can retreat for some quiet time, allowing him to learn to be on his own for short periods.

Blunder 4

Feeding table scraps

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Although we are so easily persuaded to give into big, soulful eyes staring at us longingly while we wolf down a cheeseburger, feeding table scraps is a bad habit to get into.  If you start to feed your puppy scraps from the table, he will come to expect food from your plate (and from others) at every meal.  It is far better for your puppy’s health if he is only fed with dog food and far better for your dinner guests if your puppy is kept at a distance from the table during mealtimes.

Blunder 5

Taking him out of the crate

dog-crate

As mentioned above, crate training is great for giving your dog his own personal space and this can be the perfect place to sleep at night too.  Initially adjusting to being in the crate overnight can take a while as the puppy is used to sleeping with his mother and the rest of the litter. It is common for the puppy to cry in the crate at first, but don’t be tempted to take him out of the crate.  Allow the puppy to fall asleep by himself by covering the crate with a blanket (or a cute fabric crate cover) so that it is darker inside. Sometimes placing a ticking clock outside of the crate can have a  soothing effect on a pup.

puppy-progression-picture

Above all, when training your dog, be kind,  patient, and consistent.  You will absolutely reap the rewards in the long term and will be able to enjoy your precious time together. January is National Train Your Dog Month; what better time to start?

Have you had any hilarious experiences when training puppies? We’d love to hear about them.

Staying Safe on the Road

 

With the extreme weather conditions currently affecting many parts of the United States, and millions of Americans preparing to drive home for the Holidays, what can be done to keep your loved ones safer in snow and ice?

ice-and-snow

Prepare your vehicle for winter

  • Install snow tires on your vehicle, not all-season radials.  Snow tires give extra traction in ice and snow.
  • Make sure your spare tire is also a snow tire.
  • Ensure your tires are correctly inflated.
  • Chains add another level of safety.
  • Upgrade your coolant levels.
  • Use windshield cleaner rated for winter conditions.
  • Check your battery and replace it if unreliable.
  • Carry a bag of sand, both for weight and traction, and a snow shovel.
  • It’s not always easy to change your vehicle, but if you will be travelling in winter conditions as a matter of habit, choose a vehicle with front wheel drive, all-wheel drive, or 4-wheel drive.  Rear wheel drive vehicles are more difficult to handle in icy conditions.
  • Install a Travall vehicle-specific pet barrier
  • Keep locks from freezing up by using WD-40

man-putting-chains-on-tires

Know the road conditions 

First and foremost, if the conditions are not safe, do not go! If you absolutely must, then plan your route well in advance.  Check road safety conditions before you leave and try to check conditions as the journey progresses.

Check the weather forecast before you leave

Try to check out the weather forecast for your current location, your final destination and for points along the route.  If you are aware of weather warnings, there will be fewer surprises on the way. Carry chains if snow is expected and if you’ll be travelling in hills or mountains. Ensure that everyone travelling has the appropriate clothing for the anticipated weather conditions. Having coats, hats, gloves and sturdy boots in the car is essential if you will be travelling in snowy conditions.

Fuel up

Start off with a full tank of gas and where possible don’t allow your tank to drop below half way. You may have to stop off at the gas station more frequently, but you don’t want to run out of gas in snowy conditions.

Prepare for driving in wintry conditions

Know how to drive in icy or snowy conditions.  Use an empty parking lot to practice steering out of a skid.  Drive more slowly than usual and slower than the posted speed limits.  Allow more distance between you and other vehicles. Pump brakes gently and use gears to slow down.

Carry an emergency survival kit 

  • First aid kit
  • Flares
  • Blankets
  • Garbage sacks that could double as a tarp or rain poncho
  • High energy food like granola bars or dried fruit.
  • A portable stove
  • Matches or a lighter
  • Candles (use for light and to keep the vehicle warm)
  • Tin can for melting snow for water.
  • Coats, wool socks, gloves, scarves and other winter clothing

first-aid-kit

Where possible use main roads

This may not always be an option, but try to stick to major routes, so if you do become stranded you can be found more quickly and easily.

Additional driving tips

  • Drive according to the conditions.
  • Reduce speed in poor visibility, where there is snow, or if ice may have formed.
  • Stay in a higher gear to help keep control of the vehicle and avoid harsh braking and acceleration.
  • Maintain larger safer stopping distances, you may have to double or even triple your stopping distance.
  • Use dimmed headlights in poor visibility and snow, so others can see you.
  • Use rear fog lights.

If you get stranded stay with your vehicle

If you need to keep the engine running to keep warm, ensure that the exhaust is not clogged with snow.

Try to keep mobile devices charged so you can call for assistance if necessary

 america-in-snow

Wherever you are driving during the Holidays, we wish you a good and safe journey. Happy Holidays!

dogs-driving-truck-home-for-christmas

 

 

Doggy activities: The Dog Park

In the series of things you can do with your dog to keep him happy and active I have so far tackled taking your pooch to the beach and advised you to make a (small) change in your walking route. Today I will be talking about taking your beloved four-legged friend to a place a lot of you will be familiar with already. However, for those of you who are unfamiliar with them or who have some doubts, let me introduce you to… the dog park.

Dog park this way
Dog park this way

Off-leash dog parks are a wonderful place where you can let your pooch off-leash and run around and play with his friends. Because in most states and counties, dogs have to be leashed during their walks, they can be hindered in socializing with their fellows. In their hearts, dogs are still animals that roam, but we keep them in our houses and backyard, thus limiting their space. In the dog park they can be more true to their nature, lose some of their pent-up energy and, most importantly, have fun! And frankly, you can do the same as dog parks are a great place to meet new friends, human or canine.

Making friends and having fun
Making friends and having fun

I my post has convinced you to try out the dog park, please keep the following in mind. These parks are a great benefit for every dog and dog owner. However, in order to keep everyone happy and to keep these lovely places open, it is important that you follow the rules. Some parks have restriction on how many dogs can be inside at the same time. In others there are separate areas according to the dog’s size. And in some of these dog parks children are not allowed in. However, all of these parks have one rule in common, the one rule that all visitors must adhere to: cleaning up the dog’s waste. Following these rules will make the city happy and keep the park open, which makes your dogs happy, which will make you happy. So why not give it a try?

Dog beach: paradise of sand and water

Paradise
Paradise of sand and water

Last week I started the new topic of things to do with your dog by advising you to take your pooch to a new area during the (daily) walk. This will stimulate and motivate them, just like it does humans. Think about it, sometimes you get in a routine and after a while it just starts to feel like a drag. So we go on holiday for a change of scenery and new sights. This is exactly what you’ll be doing for your dog by changing their route.

Today’s advice is pretty close to last week’s, however instead of turning into a new street on the walk, why not go a bit further and take your four-legged family member to the beach. If the new street was like a holiday, then the beach will be like paradise to your dog, a paradise of sand and water.

Making new, somewhat strange, friends
Making new, somewhat strange, friends

For a lot of dogs, the beach is like a foreign place on a planet that is just waiting to be explored. The beach sand will hold thousands of scents from people, various animals, other dogs, and who knows what else. And for the dog who isn’t afraid of water, swimming in the sea will bring exercise to a whole new level. A trip to the dog beach holds numerous possibilities to occupy your dog. From running and swimming to playing fetch, exploring and meeting new friends or just enjoying some sunshine, this doggy paradise has it all.

This Lab want to take the sandy paradise home with him
This Lab want to take the sandy paradise home with him

Before taking your dog to beach, however, you should be prepared. First, look up what is allowed on your local (dog) beach. Are dogs allowed off-leash? Are they only welcome during certain times? Next, prepare yourself for a very dirty dog at the end of the day. After frolicking on land and in the sea, you’ll probably want to wash and dry your dog before heading home, especially if you came by car. Though in that case I suggest you also protect your car by equipping it with some sturdy rubber mats. Also, do not forget to bring plenty of food and fresh water for your pooch. They will get thirsty and should not drink from the salty sea water! Keep an eye out for heat stroke too in summer and make sure there is some shade if you stay for a

longer time. Lastly, do not forget to clean after your dog in case he does his business on the beach. This way everyone can enjoy a nice beach!

Would you be willing to take your dog to doggy paradise? Or have they already been to this magical land of sand and water? Feel free to share your stories and anecdotes in the comments.